pip|is|trel

pip|is|trel
pip|is|trel or pip|is|trelle «PIHP uh STREHL», noun.
any one of a group of small brown or grayish bats, especially one found in the eastern United States and Mexico.
[< French pipistrelle < Italian pipistrello, variant of vespertilio < Latin vespertīliō; see etym. under vespertilionine (Cf.vespertilionine)]

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pip — Pip, n. [OE. pippe, D. pip, or F. p[ e]pie; from LL. pipita, fr. L. pituita slime, phlegm, rheum, in fowls, the pip. Cf. {Pituite}.] A contagious disease of fowls, characterized by hoarseness, discharge from the nostrils and eyes, and an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pip — Pip, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Pipped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pipping}.] [See {Peep}.] To cry or chirp, as a chicken; to peep. [1913 Webster] To hear the chick pip and cry in the egg. Boyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pip — Pip, n. [Formerly pippin, pepin. Cf. {Pippin}.] (Bot.) A seed, as of an apple or orange. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pip — Pip, n. [Perh. for pick, F. pique a spade at cards, a pike. Cf. {Pique}.] One of the conventional figures or spots on playing cards, dominoes, etc. Addison. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pip-pip — interjection Etymology: probably from pip pip, imitating the sound of a horn Date: 1907 British used to express farewell …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • pip-squeak — {n.}, {informal} A small, unimportant person. * /If the club is really democratic, then every little pip squeak has the right to say what he thinks./ * /When the smallest boy was chosen to be the monitor, the class bully said he would not obey a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pip-squeak — {n.}, {informal} A small, unimportant person. * /If the club is really democratic, then every little pip squeak has the right to say what he thinks./ * /When the smallest boy was chosen to be the monitor, the class bully said he would not obey a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pip — I. noun Etymology: Middle English pippe, from Middle Dutch (akin to Old High German pfiffīz), from Vulgar Latin *pipita, alteration of Latin pituita phlegm, pip; perhaps akin to Greek pitys pine more at pine Date: 15th century 1. a. a disorder of …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • pip-squeak — noun Date: 1910 one that is small or insignificant …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Pipped — Pip Pip, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Pipped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pipping}.] [See {Peep}.] To cry or chirp, as a chicken; to peep. [1913 Webster] To hear the chick pip and cry in the egg. Boyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pipping — Pip Pip, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Pipped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pipping}.] [See {Peep}.] To cry or chirp, as a chicken; to peep. [1913 Webster] To hear the chick pip and cry in the egg. Boyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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